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ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG POLICYEdit

To comply with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989 (DFSCA) and subsequent amendments, students and employees of College/University are informed that strictly enforced policies are in place which prohibit the possession, use or distribution of any illicit drugs, including alcohol, on College/University property or as part of any College/University-sponsored activity unless event-specific permission is given for of-age students to consume alcohol moderately. Students and employees are also subject to all applicable legal sanctions under local, state and federal law for any offenses involving illicit drugs on College/University property or at College/University-sponsored activities.[1]

College/University affirms that illegal drug use is unlawful and harmful. The use of illegal drugs and alcohol abuse by students and employees could result in cognitive deficits, loss of productivity, and other health risks. These risks include an increased risk of accidents, which may result in death or permanent injury. Free, confidential counseling for alcohol and other drug abuse issues is available to students and employees through the College/University Counseling Services, Health Services, and the employee assistance program. Other resources may include assessment, individual counseling, educational programs, materials, and referral and case management through community agencies, all of which might include a fee.

Students exhibiting signs of excessive alcohol consumption willbe transported via Emergency Medical Services (EMS) at the student’s expense for medical attention. Refusal to cooperate with EMS personnel may result in arrest [by local/campus police] in order to ensure the student’s health and safety and/or a conduct complaint for disorderly conduct and/or failure to comply.

Parental Notification PolicyEdit

College/University is concerned about students who improperly use alcohol and other drugs and the effects such use may have on their health, academic success, interpersonal relationships and, ultimately, their future.

College/University alcohol policy expressly forbids possession and/or consumption of alcohol by students, employees or guests who are under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years. Possession of drug paraphernalia and the use, manufacture, sale, or distribution of illegal drugs, whether on or off campus, by any student is also prohibited. In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the Director of Student Conduct (or designee) reserves the right to notify the parents/guardians of students under 21 years of age, and the parents/guardians of dependent students, regardless of age, of any incident in which the student is found responsible for violating the College/University alcohol and drug policy.

Alcohol PolicyEdit

The following sections describe College/University policy regarding the sale, service, distribution, and consumption of alcoholic beverages on university property or at college/university-sponsored events in accordance with federal, state and local laws.

Basic GuidelinesEdit

Students who are 21 years of age or older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol in designated university housing rooms. Students who are of legal drinking age may not share or provide alcohol to any students, employees or guests who are under 21 years of age. Those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years are not permitted to possess or consume alcohol anywhere on university property or at university-sponsored events. Drinking games, and simulated drinking games (e.g. water pong) are prohibited on campus.

Examples of Violations of the University Alcohol PolicyEdit

  • Purchasing alcohol by a person under the age of 21.
  • Selling or providing alcohol to a person under the age of 21.
  • Possessing either full [or empty] alcohol containers by a person under the age of 21.
  • Consuming alcohol by a person under the age of 21.
  • Showing physical or mental impairment following or resulting from alcohol use.
  • [Possessing empty alcohol containers for decorative purposes].
  • Using or possessing common sources of alcohol including, but not limited to kegs, party balls, punch bowls, wine boxes, etc.
  • Participating in or being present during the occurrence of any drinking game.
  • Possessing an open container of alcohol in a common area including, but not limited to bathrooms, hallways, lounges, elevators, lobbies or outdoor spaces.
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol.

As stated in Section 4 of the Code of Student Conduct, “failure to comply with the reasonable directives of university officials or law enforcement officers during the performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so”, is considered unacceptable behavior for a university student. An example of such behavior includes refusing to submit to a breath test when requested by a police officer, whether on or off-campus, which is considered a violation of the university Code of Student Conduct and may result in conduct sanctions.

A partial list of university alcohol policy violations and their subsequent sanctions is listed below. Sanctions are dependent upon a number of factors including, but not limited to: hearing officer discretion, the nature and severity of the incident, a student’s conduct history and a student’s cooperation throughout the conduct process.

Minor in Possession/Consumption of Alcohol or Residence Life Alcohol Policy Violations:Edit

  1. First Offense—Possible sanctions and institutional actions include, but are not limited to:
    • Participation in an alcohol education activity and/or a Minor in Possession course, at the student’s expense and as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee);
    • Authorship of a research/reflection essay;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students and those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years; and/or
    • Reprimand up through suspension or expulsion from housing and/or the college/university;
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).
  2. Second Offense— Possible sanctions and institutional actions include, but are not limited to:
    • Mandated substance abuse assessment by an approved agency and required compliance with the assessing counselor’s evaluation;
    • Observation of one or more sessions of the County Misdemeanor or Felony Drug Court as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee);
    • Authorship of a research/reflection essay;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students and those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years; and/or
    • Reprimand up through suspension or expulsion from housing and/or the college/university;
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).
  3. Third and Subsequent Offenses— Possible sanctions and institutional actions include, but are not limited to:
    • Suspension or expulsion from university housing and/or the college/university;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students or those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years; and/or
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).

Purchasing, Selling or Providing Alcohol to Minors:Edit

  1. First Offense— Possible sanctions and institutional actions include, but are not limited to:
    • Participation in an alcohol education activity at the student’s expense and as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (designee);
    • Mandated substance abuse assessment by an approved agency and required compliance with the assessing counselor’s evaluation;
    • Observation of one or more sessions of the County Misdemeanor or Felony Drug Court as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee);
    • Authorship of a research/reflection essay;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students or those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years;
    • Eligibility restrictions;
    • Reprimand up through suspension or expulsion from housing and/or the college/university;
    • Community service hours to be performed at a specific location as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee); and/or
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).
  2. Second and Subsequent Offenses— Possible sanctions and institutional actions include, but are not limited to:
    • Suspension or expulsion from the college/university;
    • Notification of law enforcement authorities;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students or those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years; and/or
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).

Driving Under the Influence/Driving While Intoxicated:Edit

College/University is concerned about students who violate state and local laws regarding consumption of alcohol and the operation of motor vehicles. In accordance with state law, the university abides by the legal definition of intoxicated as “not having the normal use of mental or physical faculties by reason of introduction of alcohol, a controlled substance, a drug, a dangerous drug, a combination of two or more of those substances, or any other substance into the body” or 0.08 Breath or Blood Alcohol Concentration. In addition, students under the legal minimum drinking age of 21 years who are found to have any detectable amount of alcohol in their systems will be considered driving under the influence of alcohol and subject to penalties under that offense.

  1. First Offense— Possible sanctions and institutional actions include, but are not limited to:
    • Loss of driving and/or parking privileges on campus for a specified period of time;
    • Participation in an alcohol education activity and/or a Minor in Possession course, at the student’s expense and as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (designee);
    • Observation of one or more sessions of the County Misdemeanor or Felony Drug Court as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee);
    • Community services hours to be performed at a specific location as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee);
    • Authorship of a research/reflection essay;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students or those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years;
    • Eligibility restrictions; and/or
    • Reprimand up through suspension or expulsion the college/university;
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).
  2. Second and Subsequent Offenses— Possible sanctions and institutional actions include, but are not limited to:
    • Suspension or expulsion from the university;
    • Notification of law enforcement authorities;
    • otification of parents/guardians of dependent students and those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years; and/or
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).

Illegal Drug PolicyEdit

The following sections describe College/University’s policy regarding the sale, manufacture, distribution, possession and use of illegal drugs on or off College/University property or at College/University-sponsored events or programs in accordance with federal, state and local laws. Examples of violations include:

  • Misuse of over-the-counter drugs.
  • Misuse or sharing of prescription drugs.
  • Possessing, using, being under the influence of, distributing, or manufacturing any form of illegal drug.
  • Possessing paraphernalia (i.e., rolling papers, pipes, bongs, etc.) for intended or implied use of any form of illegal drug.
  • Possessing paraphernalia that contains or appears to contain illegal drug residue.
  • Purchasing or passing illegal drugs from one person to another.
  • Using mail services to purchase, pass, or distribute illegal drugs.

This policy provides flexibility for the College/University in addressing drug-related offenses which occur on- or off-campus. Moreover, it permits the College/University to address its fundamental mission of holistic education and the development of human potential. While recognizing that there is a need to address violations related to the use or possession of controlled substances, the College/University must address the education and well-being of all its students and employees. In addition to College/University imposed sanctions, students and employees are subject to all legal sanctions under federal, state and local law for any offenses involving illegal drugs on College/University property or at College/University activities.

Safe HarborEdit

The College/University has a Safe Harbor rule for students. The College/University believes that students who have a drug and/or addiction problem deserve help. If any College/University student brings their own use, addiction or dependency to the attention of College/University officials outside the threat of drug tests or imposition of the conduct process and seeks assistance, a conduct complaint will not be pursued. A written action plan may be used to track cooperation with the Safe Harbor program by the student. Failure to follow the action plan will nullify the Safe Harbor protection and the campus conduct process will be initiated.

A partial list of College/University drug policy violations and their subsequent sanctions is listed below.

Manufacture, Sale or Distribution of Illegal Drugs:Edit

  1. First Offense—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to:
    • Expulsion from the College/University;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of students under 21 years of age and older dependent students;
    • Notification of law enforcement authorities; and/or
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).

For the Possession or Use of Drug Paraphernalia, Synthetic Substances and/or Illegal Drugs:Edit

Drug paraphernalia (e.g. bongs), illegal drugs, and synthetic substances (e.g. K2, Spice) whose common purpose is to replicate the effects of illegal substances are prohibited on campus.

  1. First Offense—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to:
    • Suspension or expulsion from College/University housing;
    • Suspension from the College/University for a period of not less than the remainder of the semester in which the infraction occurred;
    • Participation in a drug education activity, at the student’s expense and as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee);
    • Mandated substance abuse assessment by an approved agency and required compliance with the assessing counselor’s evaluation;
    • Observation of one or more sessions the County Misdemeanor or Felony Drug Court as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee);
    • Authorship of a research/reflection essay;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of students under 21 years of age and older dependent students;
    • Notification of law enforcement authorities; and/or
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).
  2. Second Offense— Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to:
    • Expulsion from the College/University;
    • Notification of parents/guardians of students under 21 years of age and older dependent students;
    • Notification of law enforcement authorities; and/or
    • Other sanctions as determined by the Director of Student Conduct (or designee).

Information Regarding the Impact of Alcohol and Other Drug UseEdit

Risks of Alcohol UseEdit

The following is a partial list of the adverse effects of alcohol use on the individual and society arranged by source.

  1. The Truth about Alcohol: Tips for Teens (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 2003)
    • Alcohol affects your brain. Drinking alcohol leads to a loss of coordination, poor judgment, slowed reflexes, distorted vision, memory lapses, and even blackouts.
    • Alcohol affects your body. Alcohol can damage every organ in your body. It is absorbed directly into your bloodstream and can increase your risk for a variety of life-threatening diseases, including cancer.
    • Alcohol affects your self-control. Alcohol depresses your central nervous system, lowers your inhibitions, and impairs your judgment. Drinking can lead to risky behaviors, including having unprotected sex. This may expose you to HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases or cause unwanted pregnancy.
    • Alcohol can kill you. Drinking large amounts of alcohol can lead to coma or even death. Also, in 1998, 35% of traffic deaths of 15- to 20-year-olds were alcohol-related.
  1. From Top Ten Myths About Alcohol (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: National Institutes of Health)
    • Can you hold your liquor? That is not a good thing. If you have to drink increasingly larger amounts of alcohol to get a “buzz” or get “high”, you are developing tolerance. This increases your vulnerability to many serious problems, including alcoholism.
    • One in three 18- to 24-year-olds admitted to emergency rooms for serious injuries are intoxicated. And alcohol is also associated with homicides, suicides, and drownings.
  1. The Naked Truth: Alcohol and Your Body (FactsOnTap.org)
    • The amount of alcohol it takes to make you pass out is dangerously close to the amount of alcohol it takes to kill you.
    • A hangover is caused partly by the body’s being poisoned by alcohol and partly by the body’s reaction to withdrawal from alcohol.
  1. Harmful Interactions: Mixing Alcohol with Medicines (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services)
    • Some medicines that you might never have suspected can react with alcohol, including many medications that can be purchased ‘over-the-counter’. Even some herbal remedies can have harmful effects when combined with alcohol.
    • Mixing alcohol with certain medications [both prescription and over-the-counter] can cause nausea and vomiting, headaches, drowsiness, fainting, or loss of coordination. It can also put you at risk for internal bleeding, heart problems, and difficulties in breathing. In addition to these dangers, alcohol can make a medication less effective or even useless, or it may make the medication harmful or toxic to your body.
    • Alcohol and medicines can interact harmfully even if they are not taken at the same time.
    • Medications are safe and effective when used appropriately. Your pharmacist or other health care provider can help you determine which medications interact harmfully with alcohol.
  1. Facts About Women and Alcohol (Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse)
    • Women are more susceptible to the influence of alcohol just prior to or during their menstrual cycle than at other times during their cycle.
    • On average, a woman weighing 120 pounds requires 2.5 hours to metabolize one [standard] drink.
    • The course of alcohol addiction progresses at a faster rate among women than men.

Risks of Drug UseEdit

The following is a partial list of the adverse effects of drug use on the individual and society arranged by source.

  1. Marijuana... It Can Leave You Breathless!(Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse)
    • Marijuana contains over 400 different chemicals including THC.
    • “THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, remains in the fat cells of the body from 14 – 30 days.”
    • Marijuana use…
      1. Slows reaction time;
      2. Impairs thinking;
      3. Interferes with Coordination;
      4. Impairs comprehension skills;
      5. Impairs mathematical skills;
      6. Impairs reading skills;
      7. Impairs verbal skills; and
      8. Can lead to psychological dependency.
    • Long term, regular use of marijuana can have a permanent, negative effect on attention span, concentration, memory, judgment and logical thought.
    • Smoking one marijuana cigarette is as harmful to the lungs as smoking approximately 4 - 5 regular cigarettes. Smoking both greatly increases the risk of developing emphysema, cancer and other lung diseases.
    • Regular use of marijuana can affect fertility in males as it can suppress testosterone production.
  2. Drugs & Pregnancy... No Way to Start a Life! and Drug Abuse & Pregnancy (Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse)
    • The use of marijuana during pregnancy may result in low birth weight and smaller length and head circumference in babies.
    • Babies whose mothers smoked marijuana during pregnancy may have vision problems and shorter attention spans. Also, THC, the ingredient in marijuana that causes the ‘high,’ accumulates in the mother’s milk and transfers to nursing infants where is could cause harm to the baby’s development.
    • The use of cocaine during pregnancy increases the risk of hemorrhage and premature delivery. Chronic use of cocaine causes increased risk of spontaneous abortion.
    • Nursing babies of cocaine abusers can also receive doses of cocaine through their mother’s milk.
    • Mental retardation and abnormal facial features have been seen in babies whose mothers used inhalants or solvents in combination with alcohol while they were pregnant.
    • The use of solvents during pregnancy has also been linked to central nervous system defects in newborns.
    • Heroin use during pregnancy increases the likelihood of stillbirths and neonatal deaths, and babies born to opiate-addicted mothers experience withdrawal symptoms such as restlessness, tremulousness [tremors], sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, high-pitched crying, frantic fist sucking and seizures.
  3. Inhalants... Deadly Fumes! (Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse)
    • Products such as spray paint, glues, felt-tip markers, typewriter correction fluid, poppers and RUSH are considers inhalants.
    • The immediate effects of sniffing inhalants are disorientation, confusion, feelings of drunkenness, possible hallucinations, incoherence and loss of memory.
    • Sniffing inhalants can cause unpredictable or violent behavior in some persons. In other cases, it may cause someone to become withdrawn and isolated.
    • Inhalant abuse can cause permanent brain, liver, heart and lung damage.
  4. Amphetamines... A Dead End Street! (Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse)
    • Amphetamines are used to treat some forms of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and narcolepsy.
    • The term amphetamines refers to three related drugs: amphetamine, dextroamphetamine and methamphetamine.
    • Street names for amphetamines include: speed, white crosses, uppers, and crystal.
    • Health risks associated with amphetamine use:
      1. Brain damage;
      2. Skin Disorders;
      3. Lung Disease;
      4. Delusions;
      5. Paranoia;
      6. Malnutrition;
      7. Ulcers;
      8. Heart Disease; and
      9. Hallucinations.
  5. Steroids(Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse)
    • Synthetic anabolic steroids are drugs which act like the male hormone, testosterone…Some athletes use steroids to increase their strength, muscle mass, and endurance. While not all athletes use steroids, many weight lifters and body builders do…Also, some non-athletes who want well-defined muscular shape and attractive over-all body appearance use steroids.
    • A partial list of the adverse side-effects experienced by male users includes:
      1. Enlarged breasts;
      2. Permanent premature hair loss;
      3. Shrinkage of the testicles;
      4. Risk of heart and blood vessel disease; and
      5. Sterility.
    • A partial list of the adverse side-effects experienced by female users includes:
      1. Male-sounding voice;
      2. Growth of permanent facial hair;
      3. Reduction in breast size;
      4. Male-like muscle growth;
      5. Increased sex drive; and
      6. Permanent sterility.
    • A partial list of the adverse side-effects shared by male and female users includes:
      1. Pimples & skin blemishes;
      2. Inability to release body heat through sweating;
      3. Abnormal blood clotting;
      4. Unusually aggressive behavior;
      5. Violent rages;
      6. High blood pressure;
      7. Liver dysfunction;
      8. Depression and frustration;
      9. Drug dependency; and
      10. Liver cancer.

FootnotesEdit

  1. Consider linking to applicable local, state and federal codes and statutes.